Meet your Innkeepers: Patty & Mason Tarr:

   The Tarrs have a simple philosophy to running a bed and breakfast; when it comes to hospitality "we treat our guests the way we like

   to be treated and offer them the same quality of service we expect when we stay at an inn, B&B or boutique hotel.” The Tarrs are friendly,

   professional and accommodating. They work hard to meet guests’ special needs and strive to exceed expectations.

   Patty grew up near Atlantic City, NJ. Her background is in finance and she held a position as Vice President of Finance for an Atlantic

   City based architectural firm for twenty-five years. She loves cooking and baking, calls herself a foodie, and is a self-taught chef. She has

   a natural talent for cooking and entertaining.

 

  Mason grew up in Philadelphia. His education is in marketing, and he managed his family’s party rental business for fourteen years.

   Most recently he was a corporate customer liaison for a national relocation company. He loves horticulture and has a beautiful Bonsai

   collection.

 

   It was Patty’s lifelong dream of owning a B&B that launched the

   Tarr's career in the lodging industry. In 2006, they purchased a

   boutique hotel style bed and breakfast in Eastern North Carolina. 

   They owned and operated it for eight years, turning it into a 5 star

   lodging destination. What motivates the Tarrs is their desire to

   satisfy customers. "The ultimate compliment we can receive is to

   have a repeat customer and for them to share their experience with

   their friends.” 

   Patty and Mason appreciate the beauty and character of historic

   properties like the Inn at Glencairn. There is so much to do in

   Princeton, Lawrenceville and the neighboring towns. "We know

   you’ll love it here too.”

 

   Proprietor Janet Cochoff Pressel is a former stock analyst from New York who, along with her husband, Michael, purchased

   Glencairn as a private residence in 1999. After living in Glencairn for nearly five years, they discovered that the house truly came to life

   when they were entertaining and so began the thought to convert the historic home into a bed and breakfast. Upon the birth of their

   daughter in 2004, Janet retired from her career on Wall Street to focus her efforts full time on the start up of the Inn.

  Inn History

 

  

  The Opdykes, a Dutch family from New York, were the first recorded settlers

    on the site of Glencairn in 1697. The present stone wing of the manor house was

    likely built in the early 1700s. The property was in the Opdyke family until 1762

    when it was sold to Daniel Hunt.

   The sale to the Hunts marked the transition of Glencairn from Dutch to

    English proprietorship. During this period, the center hall frame was built and

    served as an excellent example of Georgian architecture.

  

   In 1776, while the British army was quartered in Princeton, Glencairn was believed

   to have been confiscated as British quarters and even served as a Hessian

   Hospital for a brief period during the Revolutionary War.

 

   The house remained in the Hunt family passing from the Gulicks to the Connahs

   until the 1940s when it was sold to the Perot family, at which time it was divided

   into three apartments and even lay vacant for several years until 1976.

 

  

   During the peak of bicentennial fever, the house was purchased by brothers Clifford and Stephen Zink and Alex Greenwood with the goal

   of returning Glencairn back to its 18th century splendor as documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey. During this time, the

   red frame barn was relocated to the back of the property from Dutch Neck and the New Jersey Barn Company was born from that event.

 

   For the next twenty years, Glencairn was again a private residence and in 2005 it began a new chapter as a bed and breakfast following the

   renovation led by the Pressels and Ford3 Architects. For the first time in its rich life, this important historic structure is being shared and

   enjoyed with the public.